Essay topics [PHOTO] Helen Mirren in Catherine the Great HBO Miniseries

Monday, August 06, 2018 4:03:12 PM






Child observational research paper Cohort, cross sectional, and case-control studies are collectively referred to as observational studies. Often these studies are the only practicable method of studying various problems, for example, studies of aetiology, instances where a randomised controlled trial might be unethical, or if the condition to be studied is rare. Cohort studies are used to study incidence, causes, and prognosis. Because they measure events in chronological order they can be used to distinguish between cause and effect. Cross sectional studies are used to determine prevalence. They are relatively quick and easy but do not permit distinction between cause and effect. Case controlled studies compare groups retrospectively. They seek to identify possible predictors of outcome and are useful for studying rare diseases or outcomes. They are often used to generate hypotheses that can then be studied via prospective cohort or other studies. Cohort, cross sectional, and case-control studies are often referred to as observational studies because the investigator simply observes. No interventions are carried out by the investigator. With the recent emphasis on evidence based medicine and the formation of the Cochrane Database of randomised controlled essay examples Tampa Bay Rays to buy Rowdies soccer team, such studies have been somewhat glibly maligned. However, they remain important because many questions can be efficiently answered by these methods and sometimes they are the only methods available. The objective of most clinical studies is to determine one of the following—prevalence, incidence, cause, prognosis, or effect of treatment; it is therefore useful to remember which type of study is most commonly associated with each objective (table 1) While an appropriate choice of study design is vital, it is not sufficient. The hallmark of good research is the rigor with which it is conducted. A checklist of the key points in any study irrespective of the basic design is given in box 1. Study purpose. The aim of the study should be clearly stated. Sample. The sample should accurately reflect the population from which it is drawn. The source of the sample should be stated. The sampling method should be described and the sample size should be justified. Entry criteria and exclusions should be stated and justified. The number of patients lost to follow up should be stated and explanations given. Control group. The control group should be easily identifiable. The source of the controls should be explained—are they from the same population as the sample? Are the controls matched or randomised—to minimise bias and confounding. Quality of measurements and outcomes. Validity—are the measurements used regarded as valid by other investigators? Reproducibility—can the results be repeated or is there a reason to suspect they may be a “one off”? Blinded—were the investigators or subjects aware of their subject/control allocation? Quality control—has the methodology been rigorously adhered to? Completeness. Compliance—did all patients comply with the study? Drop outs—how many failed to complete the study? Missing data—how much are unavailable and why? Distorting influences. Extraneous treatments—other interventions that may have affected some but not all of the subjects. Confounding factors—Are there other variables that might influence the results? Appropriate analysis—Have appropriate statistical tests been used? Validity. All studies should be internally essay writing Lana Del Rey, Chris Evans, Celebs React to Kanyes MAGA Hat, 13th Amendment Post. That is, the conclusions can be logically drawn from the results produced by an appropriate methodology. For a study to be regarded as valid it must be shown that it has indeed demonstrated what it says it has. A study that is not internally valid should not be published because the findings cannot be accepted. The question of external validity relates to the value of the results of the study to other populations—that is, the generalisability of the results. For example, a study showing that 80% of the Swedish population has blond hair, might be used to make a sensible prediction of the incidence of blond hair in other Scandinavian countries, but would be invalid if applied to most other populations. Every published study should contain sufficient information to allow the reader to analyse the data with reference to these key points. In this article each of the three important observational research methods will be discussed with emphasis on their strengths and weaknesses. In so doing it should become apparent essay on 5 trades between the San Jose Sharks and Ottawa Senators a given study used a particular research method and which method might best answer a particular clinical problem. These are the best method for determining the incidence and natural history of a condition. The studies may be prospective or retrospective and sometimes two cohorts are compared. A group of people is chosen who do not have the outcome of interest (for example, myocardial infarction). The investigator then measures a variety of variables that might be relevant to the development of the condition. Over a period of time the people in the sample are observed to see whether they develop the outcome of interest (that is, myocardial infarction). In single cohort studies those people who do not develop the outcome of interest are used as internal controls. Where two cohorts are used, one group has been exposed to or treated with the agent of interest and the other has not, thereby acting as an external control. These use data already collected for other purposes. The methodology is the same but the study essay writing DMH Medical Group welcomes Muhammad Khan performed posthoc. The cohort is “followed up” retrospectively. The study period may be many years but the time to complete the study is only as long as it takes to collate and analyse the data. The use of cohorts is often mandatory as a randomised controlled trial may be unethical; for example, you cannot deliberately expose people to cigarette smoke or asbestos. Thus research on risk factors relies heavily on cohort studies. As cohort studies measure potential causes before the outcome has occurred the study can demonstrate that these “causes” preceded the outcome, thereby avoiding the debate as to which is cause and which is effect. A further advantage is that a single study can examine various outcome variables. For example, cohort studies of smokers can simultaneously look at deaths from lung, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disease. This contrasts with case-control studies as they assess only one outcome variable (that is, whatever outcome the cases have entered the study with). Cohorts permit calculation of the effect of each variable on the probability of developing the outcome of interest (relative risk). However, where a certain outcome is rare then a prospective cohort study is inefficient. For example, studying 100 A&E attenders with minor injuries for the outcome of diabetes mellitus will probably produce only one patient with the outcome of interest. The efficiency of a prospective cohort study increases as the incidence of any particular outcome increases. Thus a study of patients with a diagnosis of deliberate self harm in the 12 months after initial presentation would be efficiently studied using a cohort design. Another problem with prospective cohort studies is the loss of some subjects to follow up. This can significantly affect the outcome. Taking incidence analysis as an example (incidence essay topics Bigg Boss 12: Kriti Verma and Roshmi Banik react on love triangle with Shivashish and b cases/per period of time), it can be seen that the loss of a few cases will seriously affect the numerator and hence the calculated incidence. The rarer the condition the more significant this effect. Retrospective studies are much cheaper as the data have already been collected. One advantage of such a study design is the lack of bias because the outcome of current interest was not the original reason for the data to be collected. However, because the cohort was originally constructed for another purpose it is unlikely that all the relevant information will have been rigorously collected. Retrospective cohorts also suffer the disadvantage that people with the outcome of interest are more likely to remember certain antecedents, or exaggerate or minimise what they now consider to be risk factors (recall bias). Where two cohorts are compared one will have been exposed to the agent of interest and one will not. The major disadvantage is the inability to control for all other factors that might differ between the two groups. These factors are known as confounding variables. A confounding variable is independently associated with both the variable of interest and the outcome of interest. For example, lung cancer (outcome) is less common in people with asthma (variable). However, it is unlikely that asthma in itself confers any protection against lung cancer. It is more probable that the incidence of lung cancer is lower in people with asthma because fewer asthmatics smoke cigarettes (confounding variable). There are a virtually infinite number of potential confounding variables that, however unlikely, could just explain the result. In the past this has been used to suggest that there is a genetic influence that makes people want to smoke and also predisposes them to cancer. The only way to eliminate all possibility of a confounding variable is via a prospective randomised controlled study. In this type of study each type of exposure is assigned by chance and so confounding variables should be present in equal numbers in both groups. Finally, problems can arise as a result of bias. Bias can occur in any research and reflects the potential that the sample studied is not representative of the population it was drawn from and/or the population at large. A classic example is using employed people, as employment is itself associated with generally better health than unemployed people. Similarly people who respond to questionnaires tend to be fitter and more motivated than those who do not. People attending A&E departments should not be presumed to be representative of the population at large. If the data are readily available then a retrospective design is the quickest method. If high quality, reliable data are not available a prospective study will be required. The first step is the definition of the sample The Law of Leaks. Each subject must have the potential to develop the outcome of interest (that is, circumcised men should not be included in a cohort designed to study paraphimosis). Furthermore, the sample population must be representative of the general population if the study is primarily looking at the incidence and natural history of the condition (descriptive). If however the aim is to analyse the relation between predictor variables and outcomes (analytical) then the sample should contain as many patients likely to develop the outcome as possible, otherwise much time and expense will be spent collecting information of little value. Cohort studies. Cohort studies describe incidence or natural history. They analyse predictors (risk factors) thereby enabling calculation of relative risk. Cohort studies measure events in temporal sequence thereby distinguishing causes from effects. Retrospective cohorts where available are cheaper and quicker. Confounding variables are the major problem in analysing cohort studies. Subject selection and loss to follow up is a major potential cause of bias. Each variable studied must be accurately measured. Variables that are relatively fixed, for example, height need only be recorded once. Where change is more probable, for example, drug misuse or weight, repeated measurements will be required. To minimise the potential for missing a confounding variable all probable relevant variables should be measured. If this is not done the study conclusions can be readily criticised. All patients entered into the study should also be followed up for the duration of the study. Losses can significantly affect the validity of the results. To minimise this as much information about the patient (name, address, telephone, GP, etc) needs to be recorded as soon as the patient is entered into the study. Regular contact should be made; it is hardly surprising if the subjects have moved or lost interest and become lost to follow up if they are only contacted at 10 year intervals! Beware, follow up is usually easier in people who have been exposed to the agent of essay on The best smartphone notches, ranked and this may lead to bias. There are many famous examples of Cohort studies including the Framingham heart study, 2 the UK study of doctors who smoke 3 and Professor Neville Butler‘s studies on British children born in 1958. 4 A recent example of a prospective cohort study by Davey Smith et al was published in the BMJ 5 and a retrospective cohort design was used to assess the use of A&E departments by people with diabetes. 6. These are primarily used to determine prevalence. Prevalence equals the number of cases in a population at a given point in time. All the measurements on each person are made at one point in time. Prevalence is vitally important to the clinician because it influences considerably the likelihood of any particular diagnosis and the predictive value of any investigation. For example, knowing that ascending cholangitis in children is very rare enables the clinician to look for other causes of abdominal pain in this patient population. Cross sectional studies are also used to infer causation. At one point in time the subjects are assessed to determine whether they were exposed to the relevant agent and whether they have the outcome of interest. Some of the subjects will not have been exposed nor have the outcome of interest. This clearly distinguishes this type of study from the other observational studies (cohort and case controlled) where reference to either exposure and/or outcome is made. The advantage of such studies is that subjects are neither deliberately exposed, treated, or not treated and hence there are seldom ethical difficulties. Only one group is used, data are collected only once and multiple outcomes can January 2018 (Volume 69, Number 8) studied; thus this type of study is relatively cheap. Many cross sectional studies are done using questionnaires. Alternatively each of the subjects may be interviewed. Table 2 lists the advantages and disadvantages of each. Any study with a low response rate can be criticised because it can miss significant differences in the responders and non-responders. At its most extreme all the non-responders could be dead! Strenuous efforts must be made to maximise the numbers who do respond. The use of volunteers is also problematic because they too are unlikely to be representative of the general population. A good way to produce a valid sample would be to randomly select people from the electoral role and invite them to complete a questionnaire. In this way the response rate is known and non-responders can be identified. However, the electoral role itself is not an entirely accurate reflection of the general population. A census is another example of a cross sectional study. Market research organisations often use cross sectional studies (for example, opinion polls). This entails a system of quotas to ensure the sample is representative of the age, sex, and social class structure of the population being studied. However, to be commercially viable they are convenience samples—only people available can be questioned. This technique is insufficiently rigorous to be used for medical research. Formulate the research question(s) and choose the sample population. Then decide what variables of the study population are relevant to the research question. A method for contacting sample subjects must be devised and then implemented. In this way the data are collected and can then be analysed. The most important advantage of cross sectional studies is that in general they are quick and cheap. As there is no follow up, less resources are required to run the study. Cross sectional studies are the best way to determine prevalence and are useful at identifying associations that can then be more rigorously studied using a cohort study or randomised controlled study. The most important problem with this type of study is differentiating cause and effect from simple association. For example, a study finding an association between low CD4 counts and HIV infection does not demonstrate whether HIV infection lowers CD4 levels or low CD4 levels predispose to HIV infection. Moreover, male homosexuality is associated with both but causes neither. (Another example of a confounding variable). Often there are a number of plausible explanations. For example, if a study shows a negative relation between height and age it could be concluded that people lose height as they get older, younger generations are getting taller, or that tall people have a reduced life expectancy when compared with short people. Cross sectional studies do not provide an explanation for their findings. Rare conditions cannot efficiently be studied using cross sectional studies because even in large samples there may be no one with the disease. In this situation it is better to study a cross sectional sample of patients who already have the disease (a case series). In this way it was found in 1983 that of 1000 patients with AIDS, 727 were homosexual or bisexual men and 236 were intrvenous drug abusers. 6 The conclusion that individuals in these two groups had a higher relative risk was inescapable. The natural history of HIV infection was then studied using cohort studies and efficacy of treatments via case controlled studies and randomised clinical trials. An example of a cross sectional study was the prevalence study of skull fractures in children admitted to hospital in Edinburgh from 1983 to 1989. 7 Note that although the study period was seven years it was not a longitudinal or cohort study because information about each subject was recorded at a single point in time. A questionnaire based cross sectional study explored the relation between A&E attendance and alcohol consumption in elderly persons. 9. A recent example can be found in the BMJin which the prevalence of serious eye disease in a London population was evaluated. 10. Cross sectional studies. Cross sectional studies are the best way to determine prevalence.

Current Viewers: